A reproduction of the Chadwicks’ famous Genretron will go on public view, for the first time, October 10th at Winkleman Gallery in New York—637 West 27th Street in Chelsea. The jewel of Chadwick Manor, The Genretron is a panoramic model built by the Chadwicks in the nineteenth century for the close study of Dutch landscape painting. Viewing from the central oculus, the Chadwicks used the surrounding diorama to immerse themselves in the physical atmosphere of their favorite landscapists—Hobbema, Ruisdael, Van Goyen, Van der Neer, Van Ostade, and many of the lesser shipwreck artists. This kind of immersion was crucial for their eccentric and little-known treatises on landscape aesthetics and genre painting, like Foreground Floor Debris (which hangs concurrently in the gallery).

Still largely unpublished, this theoretical writing sheds light on the extreme values the family brought to the appreciation of Dutch painting. In one of the latest and most strident of these works—The Onanist Cloud—the Chadwicks wrote of seventeenth-century Dutch art as the definitive moment in which landscape painting “vomited up the tyrant Christian landlords” who had until then “monopolized space with their tired stories.” The effect of these stories in the painting, to the Chadwicks’ way of thinking, had “contorted surrounding bodies into doctrinal registration machines whose gestures bureaucratized time.” For the Chadwicks it was Dutch painting that cleared this situation away, providing “infinite reservoirs of liberatingly mundane sequence”—freed from “managerial psychologies shown ‘absorbing’ heroic narrative messages, or simply undergoing History with a capital H.” The Chadwicks wrote of liberating mundanity not because they sought to avoid the ‘big issues,’ but because they found those issues precisely in art, like Dutch genre painting, that dispersed rather than packaged narrative—opening it to an infinity of paths and itineraries.

Though the Chadwicks hardly need an introduction, still the family is not as well known now as it was from the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries, when its prominent role both in polite society of London and in greener colonial outposts like New Amsterdam brought family members constantly before the public eye. As eminent connoisseurs, sea captains, naval engineers and amateur historians, the Chadwicks amassed one of the great collections of nautical figurines, genre paintings and difficult-to-attribute manuscripts in Western culture. Held privately at the family estates for several centuries, this material is now finding its way before the long-curious public. This is a process overseen by the conservator J. Blachly and the literary historian Lytle Shaw, editors of the Chadwick Family Archive—principal overseers, also, of the current Genretron reconstruction.

“As editors of the Chadwick family papers, Blachly and Shaw have collaborated on projects for Soft Sites, Institute of Contemporary Art/Bartram’s Garden, Philadelphia, PA; Romantic Detachment, P.S. 1/MoMA, Long Island City, NY; and Artists to Artist, Ace Gallery, New York, NY. Jimbo Blachly’s work has been exhibited widely including at the Sculpture Center, Long Island City, NY; Elizabeth Harris Gallery, New York, NY; Cirius Arts Center Cobh, Ireland; and Hunter College’s Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Art Gallery, New York, NY. He has received fellowships from the Farpath Fellowship, Dijon, France, and the Bellagio Fellowship from the Rockefeller Foundation. He earned his BFA from The School of the Art Institute, Chicago, IL, and his MFA from University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

Lytle Shaw’s poetry books include Principles of the Emeryville Shellmound, Low Level Bureaucratic Structures: A Novel, Cable Factory 20 and The Lobe. He wrote the critical study, Frank O’Hara: The Poetics of Coterie; and catalog essays on Robert Smithson for DIA Center and on The Royal Art Lodge for The Drawing Center. He is an assistant professor of English at New York University. He earned a BA in English at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, and Ph.D. in English from University of California, Berkeley."

For More Information Contact
Winkleman Gallery
637 West 27th Street
New York, NY 10001
T: 212.643.3152
F: 212.643.2040
info@winkleman.com

Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 11 – 6 PM

Press

Ellen Harvey, "The Chadwicks," BOMB Magazine, Fall 2011

Margaret Knowles, "The Chadwicks," Artforum, June 30, 2011

Jane Harris, "The Chadwicks, 'The Genretron,'" TimeOut New York, Oct 30–Nov 5, 2008

Publications

The Chadwicks, "Notes on the Genretron", 2008

The Chadwicks

The Genretron
October 10 - November 8, 2008
Opens October 10, 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Installation Views

The Chadwicks, "The Genretron", interior.

The Chadwicks, "The Genretron", interior.

The Chadwicks, "The Genretron", interior.

The Chadwicks, "The Genretron", interior.

The Chadwicks, "The Genretron", exterior

The Chadwicks, "The Genretron", exterior

The Chadwicks, "The Genretron", interior.

The Chadwicks, "The Genretron", interior.

The Chadwicks, "The Genretron", interior.

The Chadwicks, "The Genretron", interior.

The Chadwicks, "The Genretron", interior.

The Chadwicks, "The Genretron", interior.

The Chadwicks, "The Genretron", interior.

The Chadwicks, "The Genretron", interior.

The Chadwicks, "The Genretron", interior.

The Chadwicks, "The Genretron", interior.

The Chadwicks present "The Genretron"

The Chadwicks present "The Genretron"


Works

Untitled (Forest 1)

The Chadwicks, Untitled (Forest 1), 2008

Untitled (Forest 2)

The Chadwicks, Untitled (Forest 2), 2008

A floored book

The Chadwicks, A floored book, 2007

Untitled (Walker)

The Chadwicks, Untitled (Walker), 2007

Untitled (Car Bomb)

The Chadwicks, Untitled (Car Bomb), 2007

Untitled (Three Buildings [detail])

The Chadwicks, Untitled (Three Buildings [detail]), 2007

Untitled ("After Ruysdale")

The Chadwicks, Untitled ("After Ruysdale"), 2007

Untitled (Windmills [detail])

The Chadwicks, Untitled (Windmills [detail]), 2007


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